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Angehende Geschichtslehrpersonen schreiben Geschichte(n) - Zur Kontextabhängigkeit historischer Erzählleistungen

Journal Article
Angehende Geschichtslehrpersonen schreiben Geschichte(n) - Zur Kontextabhängigkeit historischer Erzählleistungen
Monika Waldis
With regard to the scientific fields of teachers’ professional competence and writing in history, this contribution focuses on the ability of future history teachers to generate a historical narration. As one element of a test to assess teachers general historical content knowledge, student teachers had to write a text on the specific issue of 19th century Swiss emigration to Brazil by using multiple documents and following a particular writing prompt, thus demonstrating their narrative competence. The texts were analyzed using a holistic rating procedure. Quality features in the realm of Rüsens' plausibility (1983) such as evidence use, contextualisation, corroboration, narrative as a construct and historical orientation were rated. Additionally text structure and linguistic connectors were evaluated. Since student teachers took the test on two occasions (t1 / t2) and the writing prompts and selection of documents were modified between t1 and t2 asking for an argumentative essay in the first and a narrative essay in the second time, this paper especially sheds light on the effects of the writing task on student teachers' narrative performance. The results indicate a remarkable influence of the writing task on several quality features of the investigated narrations. Among the argumentative texts (t1) "contextualisation" and "narrative as a construct" were rated higher whereas in the narrative texts (t2) "text structure" and "corroboration" were much more pronounced. Overall, student teachers seemed to struggle with an unusual test format leading to rather poor narrative performance.
Zeitschrift für Geschichtsdidaktik
14
63-86
2015
deutsch
1610-5982

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